"What about me". Recruiters: the forgotten victims of Resignations

Hands up if you’ve ever been punched in the stomach?

Hands up if you’re a Recruiter who’s had someone leave a job really quickly after joining, that you placed.

Similar feeling right. The anger, the breathlessness, the nausea, the feeling of bewilderment and fear of further reprisals.

It’s a horrible feeling. A person you’ve nurtured through a process, handling expectations, scheduling meetings, consoling, encouraging, talking up to managers, negotiated salary and future growth. Someone you know will excel, someone who will fit into the team, a great cultural fit, a good technical fit, well, just a damn good fit. You’re invested! You believe in this person, you believe in the company, you believe in their compatibility. And the BAM! In your inbox is that resignation letter, or you get that phone call “Sorry to bother you, but do you have time to catch up today?”

You’ve made a mistake haven’t you? You didn’t qualify properly? You pushed too hard? You didn’t push hard enough. There will be explanations that have to be made, inquisitions will be made, names will be called and frustrations will be vented. It will be the fault of the Recruiter in the eyes of the business, no matter how many stake holders were involved in the final decision.

It sucks as far as feelings go. The polar opposite to when you make that phone call to that unknown candidate you found on LinkedIn or really special Boolean string, to gauge interest and eventually hire. Karma’s an ill tempered friend, she’ll get you coming and going.

So Recruiters, before you pick up that phone, write that string, drop that email. Stop and think of the repercussions that call will have on your fellow Recruiters out there somewhere. Do you really want to cause them to go through this stomach punching purgatory?

Then of course what you’ll do is smile, maybe even giggle and do it none the less. It’s the game isn’t it. He who has the best talent wins! Game on 🙂

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Posted on May 27, 2010, in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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