Category Archives: respect

Flogging a dead horse… OR The Recruitment industry sucks!

Recruitment agencies tend to be getting a bum rap at the moment, with what seems an endless amount of people getting on the “Whack the Recruitment Agency” bandwagon.

Whilst I cannot disagree that some agencies and some Recruiters can be dodgy and misrepresent the industry as a whole, it isn’t all bad.  I’ve wrote about this before here.

However, I have noticed a distinct lack of posts from agencies or anyone really talking about dodgy clients, dodgy candidates and the like.  This post aims to balance the scorecard to a point and share some war stories from the Recruiting trenches that I have seen or heard.

So dear readers, hold onto your seats and let me tell you some stories of dodgyness, dishonestly and downright crappyness perpetrated by “clients” and “Candidates” from the eyes of a Recruiter.  I know, shocking right? It’s not just the Recruiters that are bad to deal with all the time.

Have you heard about the client who after going through a whole drawn out process of 2 interviews, psychometric tests, 3 references, turned down the candidate?  That’s not the bad bit, that happens a lot.  (but it really sucks to be a contingency recruiter when this happens) Skip forward 3 months, person who won job, leaves.  Agency candidate is hired (great to be a recruiter when this happens), all behind the back of Agency Recruiter (again, not so good).   This could all be an innocent mistake right? In fact as much was said when the Agency Recruiter called the company, first to find out what had happened, and if, in fact the person had started. (notwithstanding all candidates documentation from resume to reference checks were heavily branded in the agency logo etc) Once confirmation was given, agency person informed said client that an invoice would be coming.  NEXT was the call from the CEO informing of the mistake and that he had never OK’d the expenditure, so there was a problem.  There were threats of firing the person so as to not pay the bill etc, they said the person applied directly to them from when they had advertised (on inspection there was no ad).  After lots of negotiation, it worked out for the agent, once lawyers entered the discussion.

How about the candidate who upon signing up for a role and joining a company, just doesn’t turn up on day one?  No word, no nothing?  Days of frantic searching later, emails, phone calls to mobile at all hours, even checking with emergency services to see if there were any accidents nearby etc, the Recruiter finally found a correct home phone number.  Spoke to the candidates wife, hoping all was ok (I had called a candidate on a database and sadly I made the call in the middle of the person’s wake).  Wife informs me that the candidate is fine and is at work “sorry what is this call in regards to?”  hmmmmm accepted job, signed job, went through induction etc, just didn’t get around to leaving old job.  What the?

How about the person who rocks up to an interview with IBM and proceeds to tell the hiring managers there that “IBM stands for Idiots Become Managers” that’s not embarrassing feedback to get is it?

Or the hiring manager who says “You’re 32, how many years would I really get out of you working here before you go off and start having babies?”

OR the hiring manager who actually compliments an interviewee on her ummmm appearance

OR asks out for drinks immediately after ascertaining said candidate doesn’t have a boyfriend?

OR the candidates who say they’ll do “ANYTHING” for a job, whilst shifting in what she believed was a direct take off of Sharon Stone in “Basic Instinct”

OR clients who specifically ask for “Australians” (I cannot dignify this by expanding further)

OR clients who make offers to people after 6 interviews only to shut down that division making the person redundant after 4 weeks of work?

OR the candidate who takes another job after 2 days on new job with client because he was actually waiting for that job.

OR The clients of a start up, who scared the new hire on day 2 by sharing a joint in the office

OR Those candidates who just don’t turn up for interviews AT ALL.

OR The candidates who bring their entire family, wife, child etc to the interview and let them wait in reception during an interview?

OR The clients who just don’t pay?

OK sorry, the rant took over.  Feel free to share some more with me

The point of this post? Let’s see the world for what it is? There are good and bad everywhere.  To just get stuck into one area, one industry because it is an easy target is stupid and lazy.  Sure things can be improved in the Recruitment industry, tell me an industry that cannot improve somewhere.  I bet you can’t.  (I’ve deliberately not linked to any of these Recruitment bagging “blogs” as I don’t want to give them any more “air” time than they have already stolen)

So, stop trying to get cheap plugs and visits to your websites by highlighting these things and generally talking rubbish, there is enough stuff to sort through on the internet without sensationalist hyperbole bagging an easy target!  Hmmmm what ever happened to lawyer jokes?

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2010: The year of the Recruiter

Am I too late to start planning of 2010?

Well, seeing I survived another NYE I thought it was prudent to think of 2010, and what it will bring, personally and professionally.

Personally will be very interesting, child numero 3 is coming around April, Zach (almost 6 as he always is telling me) is starting school full time (just plain scary) and Talia (almost 3) is starting Kindergarten at a place that will be her school until she is 18 or so. Home life will therefore be hectic for the Nuroo household. Good luck wifey 🙂

Professionally, wow, what a year this promises to be. HUGE Challenges, potentially the hardest working year we as a Recruiting industry has seen!

I see 2010 as the year of the Recruiter. The market has been a little draining over the last 18 months, but I see 2010 as the year that Recruiters will come into their own. Their level of importance will enhance up the organisational thought process this year. This is all types of Recruiters, third party, RPO and Internal types.

My crystal ball sees attrition really hitting its straps, with involuntary attrition lessening and voluntary attrition almost hitting records levels. People will be voting with their feet, after 18 hard months, those who were not well looked after will jump at any opportunity to leave with promises of greener grass. Recruiters will be flat out hiring to keep up with the exodus to keep businesses on an even keel. To grow businesses, now, that WILL be a challenge, as most places will enter this highly competitive phase with less resources as they had in the pre-GFC times.

Getting resources equally focused on Attraction, Talent Pooling and Retention will be an interesting challenge for the year. (Chicken, Egg, Frypan?) My thoughts, Retention focus must be NUMBER 1 focus for companies, so look out HR people… Game on for you.

Doing more with less, seems to be a trend that will increase. Working smarter will be the key. It will be interesting to see if people still find the time to blog, write and or communicate so openly or frequently on social media, when the work is knocking so hard you cannot ignore it. Unless you are a coach or branding expert that is. (sorry couldn’t resist a little dig)

Time Management will increase in importance as will professional relationships. I have a picture of a juggler up in my office to illustrate all the balls you need in the air consistently to be successful, I fear this juggler may have to morph into an octopus to keep up.

Time to saddle up Recruiters, 2010 will make you!

My goal for 2010 is simple. To be better! I want to end 2010 in a better way that I have started it. Not that I am knocking where I am, but I want to improve. As a Father, as a Husband, as a Manager, as a Coach and as a Recruiter. I will be closer to my next career goal, if I haven’t achieved it by then, I’ll be close enough to touch it! Unless I change that goal of course.

Learnings from an evil boss

Working in the HR arena is tough! Especially in bad times. Who likes sitting across the desk from someone explaining to them that as of now your livelihood has been taken away. (I have only met person ((and catbert)) in my career who actually enjoyed it)

We are hearing lots of stories about redundancies at the moment, I was talking with one of my colleagues today about this and how we (the collective “we”) handle it. We must remember there is almost a whole generation in the workforce who have never seen a downturn. Sales people who have never seen an environment where budgets just weren’t to be found, HR people who have never had the “I’m sorry, there is just no job for you here anymore… through no fault of yours”, or candidates who have never had to find a job in a candidate rich market.. phew.

Thus the people delivering the bad news, may have never experienced the bad news before (or had to deliver it before) and may find it difficult to engender sufficient empathy to perform such a task adequately.

Poor handling of such events actually pushed me into this industry! Originally I wanted to be an HR professional. Why? because of the way a company handled my father and his redundancy. My father had worked for a company for 34 years (give or take), until in the early 90’s it was time to rationalise etc (during what one prime minister of Australia called the “Recession we had to have”) and his job was deemed redundant. How was it handled? Poorly from what I remember. Now what I remember may be a little inaccurate as it is seen through an emotional teenagers eyes. However, there was little council, little warning, little payout, little explanation, and less support. It was one of the rare times I saw my father in a very emotional state. The sole bread winner, having spent his entire working life at this establishment, only to get discarded like yesterday’s newspaper. His identity had been taken from him in my view.

My fear is that the marriage of these two points, could mean that, in these most difficult times, the handling of redundancies may not have improved.

In one of my first jobs, as a console operator at a petrol station, my boss decided to teach me a lesson. Why? I still don’t know, but the lesson was learned.

My boss at this time treated me like he was going to fire me. ALL day.. the entire 6 hour shift I had anyway. At the end of the day, he started the you’re fired conversation… I was really scared, stammering and stumbling over my words, really struggling through the conversation.

He then stopped, and grinned. “Have you ever been fired before?” he asked
“Nope” I responded nervously. “Well now you know what it feels like!” “so now before you decide to take this option with someone you know how it feels and how to respect the people you will be doing it too.” Powerful huh! This was almost 20 years ago. You know what, although harsh, and bordering on harassment, I’ve never forgotten it or the feeling.

For those of us who may have to sit in on discussions around redundancies, have the actual conversations, as well as those of us who now are charged with finding them new work, please keep a few things in mind.

Ensure you have thought of everything to prevent having to do this. Just because everyone else is, is not a good enough excuse.

Bring your empathy
. Be human, and be aware that these business decisions will have real personal effects on the people hearing the news. It may not be personal to you, it will be for them… guaranteed!

Bring your respect, and give them dignity.
Take your time in telling them, spell it out clearly and concisely (Don’t get in an argument though).

Expect to feel bad.
That’s OK. The conversations are about them, not you. If people cry, allow them to. Give them space and time, silence is OK. Do not feel the need to fill a silent void with words.

Bring some options for them.
Outplacement, agency names, something. Think about the people and what they may need before the discussion.

Be prepared for criticism and finger pointing, but again, there is no need to buy into arguments, the decision has been made.

And of course have everything organised, current and covered off BEFORE the meeting.. triple check it.

Bottom line… REMEMBER you are dealing with people (with lives, responsibilities, and dreams), not employees, not numbers, not inventory.

I read an article a little while ago which stated that

“More than 40 per cent of the Australian workforce has been made redundant at least once in their careers and for most (70 per cent) it was extremely stressful….”

The stress mentioned will be for a number of reasons, the loss of income, the loss of identity, the loss of self confidence due to the stigma attached to a redundancy.

Redundancies are not just a clear out of dead wood anymore. Good/Great people are being laid off too. IT IS A REALITY. We have a responsibility to ensure that people being made redundant know this, and as Employers, we need not to look at people who have been made redundant, actively challenge the idea that only the “Dead wood”, would be culled first. Hard business decisions are needing to be made everywhere.

OK, these are tough conversations to have, you have every right to feel uncomfortable and nervous about having them. If you are the person delivering the message…. Please remember these discussions aren’t about you, they are about the person you are talking to. Give them the respect and dignity they deserve by present for them and not just a messenger.

I am not a religious person, however the term “Do unto others…” rings true to me.

The Thumper Principle morphed into The Gambler edict